Category: in-house recruitment


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Shane Horn – Senior Partner, AdMore Recruitment – Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

The Competency Based Interview is now widely used and so you will undoubtedly face one as you move through your job search process. Ultimately, this is an opportunity for you to demonstrate your skills and ability to do the job you are being assessed for. You can view a more detailed description here

So what is the best approach and how do you ensure that you walk away from the meeting confident that you have performed well?

  • Plan and prepare.

This may sound obvious, but interviews take practice. There will be a number of questions you will naturally ready for, but there will be many that are designed to challenge you. The key here is to have examples ready but you must deliver them in a natural way. A good interviewer will be able to spot a formulaic, pre-planned answer, and will ask you again if they want to challenge you further. You may be able to give an example of dealing with a difficult situation, but can you name three? Can you name one outside of a work situation? You can learn more here

  • Understand what the competencies are that you are going to be questioned on.

Most companies, unfortunately not all, will supply you with a list of core skills, or competencies that you will be assessed on. Most will appear on a well written job profile, but if you don’t have them, ask. A good agency will be able to help, as they will most likely have had candidates in the process before. A direct hiring manager will also have access to the information. If they don’t want to supply the information, try to understand why. I don’t know of anyone that hasn’t got a job offer because they wanted to be fully briefed.

  • Use the CAR approach

You may have the best examples to give, however if you can’t articulate them, you will fall down. You may have heard of STAR, but CAR – Context, Action, and Result is a lot simpler to remember. The easiest approach is to set the scene of the example, tell the interviewer what you did, and what the result of this was. This will allow you to tell a story in a natural style, and to talk through your situation in a clear way. It also allows the assessor to question you – this is a good thing! The more the interviewer questions you, the more engaged they are.

  •  Don’t allow the interviewer to put you off your game!

Some classically trained interviewers will follow the ‘script’, showing no emotion and won’t even ask you any questions. They may have a huge amount to get through in a short period of time. Don’t let this put you off! Be confident in your ability to answer the question. There should be an opportunity at the end of the interview to build rapport so use this time wisely.

  • Expect the unexpected

More and more clients are aware that many questions can be prepared for, so expect a few curve balls. Most recently, a client of mine asked “what piece of living room furniture would you be?” Not technically a competency based interview, but one that will make you think. Also, I have known interviewers to throw a role-play into the middle of an interview to show evidence of the example a candidate gave. So be prepared to be able to back up what you say! Some of the oddest interview questions of the last 12 months can be found here

We haven’t covered general interview tips, but you can find more information here and here

I would be interested to hear of any other key points you may have, or any testing questions you may have been asked.

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By Russell Adams, AdMore Recruitment– Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

When asking candidates what type of business they wish to work for, one of the most common responses is that they are looking to work for a people focused business. On further probing, I often find that candidates struggle to articulate exactly what a people focused business means to them and a large proportion find it difficult to talk through what elements of culture they would look for in this type of business. I think in many instances, candidates tell me what they don’t want in an organisation rather than what they do want. They tend to focus on things that they don’t like about the organisation they currently work for as opposed to the desirable elements of a people focused business. What I also find very interesting is that they often don’t look at it from the perspective of cultural fit. Their desire may sometimes be a little ideological – that they want to work for a paternalistic company who treats it employees incredibly well putting them above any other objectives, without considering whether that is the culture that would best suit their own values and behaviours. The balance of these objectives against other business objectives will vary and businesses can be very different in their approach with different people suiting different cultures. What is clear and understandable is that individuals want to work in a culture where they are valued, feel empowered and rewarded for what they do.

In my view, a people focused business is one where the ideology of the organisation is that by hiring, engaging and rewarding great people you will be able to more effectively achieve the company objectives. Surely all businesses act in this way? As we are all aware, this is far from the truth.

So what exactly does a people focused look like and what are the signs to look out for?

  • A supportive culture. A people focused business is one where people are truly at the centre of its actions. One where the individual gets out as much as they are putting in. It will be a business where people feel listened to and this may manifest itself through forums and surveys as well as the openness of the culture.

 

  • Strong internal communications. High levels of communication are important in ensuring you are engaging and motivating your workforce and should lead to a greater sense of belonging and working towards a common goal. Again a great step in maximising the potential of your people.

 

  • A training and development team. Many businesses talk about the development they provide but when you ask about specific programs that are in place or budgets allocated they can provide little evidence. Truly people focused businesses will invest in people with the belief that this will increase productivity, aid retention and lead to stronger long term profits.

 

  • A structured appraisal system. Linked to the development of people is having a structured appraisal system that provides a sense of purpose, clarity of expectation and provides transparency and structure to Line Managers about how they manage their people. Again, this is a good indicator about the focus the business places on its development strategy.

 

  • Strong benefits and conditions. It is not only about how you treat and manage your workforce but also how you reward them. To attract and retain the best people, it is important that the benefits package is designed to support the individual.  This is not about necessarily offering the highest salary in your sector but is about what else you can do to provide the individual with a work/life balance to try and ensure you get the best out of them. This could range from gym membership to time off to support a local charity. All these elements are designed to improve the emotional and physical well being of the individual with the view that this will improve their productivity and contribution to the business.

 

  • A Wellness policy. The more cutting edge people focused businesses may have gone a step further and have introduced a Wellness policy. This area is growing in popularity and involves taking a more holistic approach to the care and well-being of your employees. The advocates of this philosophy believe that taking a more involved and caring approach will have significant benefits longer term not only in terms of the loyalty and motivation of the workforce but also in productivity.  Businesses introducing such schemes are likely to have a strong people focus.

 

  • Effective performance management. A people focused business isn’t about having a soft culture where poor performance is tolerated. It is about having an open, transparent culture where expectations are clear. Again, it is not about what is said but the actions that are taken.

 

  • A robust selection process. Placing importance on recruiting the right people who culturally fit the organisation and share the right values is a sign that people are really at the heart of the company’s strategy.

Many businesses will describe themselves as people focused but are they really? Whilst the list above provides some indicators, ultimately it is about culture and about behaviour.

I saw one business recently describe itself as a people focused business that does what ever it takes to deliver. So, what does it do when these elements conflict? What happens if getting that result has a negative impact on their people?  To really understand if a business is people focused you need to talk to their employees and focus on not what it says, but what does it actually does. A useful website to visit is http://www.glassdoor.co.uk which provides employer reviews by existing and previous employees.

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By Russell Adams, AdMore Recruitment– Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

Having recently read a number of blogs on this subject I feel compelled to write this as I believe most articles are very one sided in their viewpoint. Most are focused on outlining to candidates the many reasons why, when they resign, they should not be tempted to stay by a counter offer. I don’t think I have read anything explaining the reasons why you SHOULD accept a counter offer but here’s the thing – there are times and there are circumstances when the right thing to do is to stay put.

To me it all comes down to the individual’s motivations for leaving the organisation in the first place. Often individuals are very happy in their careers, working for a company they respect, where they are paid well for the job that they do, where they are culturally aligned and where they feel valued. Sometimes the missing piece and hence their desire to move on is purely driven by their ambition to take on a more senior role with more responsibility. If the counter offer entails gaining that promotion and taking on that responsibility then why not accept?

You can ask why had the promotion not happened already however sometimes (particularly in the current market) there has to be a reason or a rationale to make things happen. Your resignation may just be that catalyst that makes things happen.  Only you as an individual will know how well you have been looked after and how genuine your employer’s intentions are.

As has been well documented, I would also caution people from accepting a counter offer based on either pure promises  or increased salary alone. This is an important and difficult decision for people to make, often with two competing parties putting you under significant pressure to stay or to accept the other role.  Certainly, these situations are rarely as clear cut as many articles suggest.

My advice if you are unsure is to talk to people you trust who are impartial to the situation and who will try and make you see the situation in a balanced and unbiased way.

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By Sophie Mackenzie, AdMore Recruitment– Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

I was recently asked for some advice by a friend who had been headhunted. The salary on offer constituted a significant uplift and, although he didn’t know a great deal about the company in question, he was understandably intrigued enough to attend an interview. As the process progressed, he started to weigh up his options and subsequently came to me for my perspective as a recruiter. As is often the case, his head was spinning as the approach had come out of the blue (he was not actively looking for a new role) and what he needed was a reality check so he could consider the offer rationally.

So, here is the advice I gave him which I hope will come in useful if you ever get the call!

  • Firstly, I must clarify what I mean by headhunted. Being headhunted in its purest sense is when you have been specifically targeted by an organisation (usually a competitor) for a specific role, usually based on a recommendation or based on research which indicates that you are a proven top performer. The approach could come from the company directly, indeed some blue-chip companies are now hiring ex-headhunters to join their in-house teams to set up their own internal ‘search’ function. Most likely, the approach will be made by a search firm that has been engaged by the company. This is different to being contacted by a recruitment agency who have identified that you may be suitable for one of their client’s vacancies.

 

  • When you receive a headhunt call, it is worth establishing the credentials of the person calling. By nature, if you are not active in the market, it can be hard to track you down and so search firms may need to take a cloak and dagger approach in order to make contact, often calling you at your workplace. They should say who they are and which search firm they work for, even if at the initial stage they cannot reveal the name of their client. Bear in mind that you may also be asked to sign an NDA (non-disclosure agreement) if the brief is confidential.

 

  • A search is generally done in response to a specific role so the company should be able to give you a detailed brief, if not a copy of the Job Description. The top search firms will produce a detailed overview of your experience, skills and behavioural qualities which they will submit to the client if you are included in their shortlist and as such they will need to meet you face to face.

 

  • Usually you will be headhunted because of your specific skillset/client base/black book/track record and the approach will probably come from a competitor who knows about you. In this case, you should know a lot about the company but it is still really important that you do your research. This is even more important if you do not know the company. You need to find out what their market is, how they are performing financially, who their clients/customers/major accounts are, what their growth strategy is and most importantly (and harder to find out), what they are like to work for, how they treat their employees, what opportunities there are to progress internally. This is where you need to hone your research skills. Use the internet to find out company information and to read latest press releases, news articles etc. Scour the company website for latest annual reports. Glassdoor.co.uk is a useful source of information about company culture as it collates reviews from current and former employees (although generally at low to mid levels). The most powerful method of finding out about them is to speak to your network – do you know anyone who has worked for them recently or who works for them now?

 

  • Keep your ego in check! It is hugely flattering to be properly headhunted, particularly on the back of a specific recommendation of your work. It is easy to get swept away as you are ‘wooed’ by your suitor showering you with compliments, offering you all manner of riches and generally making you feel very special. This will be all the more powerful if you are feeling a little disgruntled in your current role – perhaps a promotion has been promised but not delivered or the company is not paying out bonuses. It may be a fantastic opportunity but you should still do your due diligence before you make any decisions. Equally, be careful not be too aloof – just because you have been approached doesn’t mean that you are guaranteed the job – you are merely entering the selection process and so you will still have to prove your worth.

 

  • In the words of Jessie J, “it’s not about the money, money, money”! If it is just about the money then be very careful indeed. If you heart starts to race thinking about the salary on offer, stop and think. Then, get a blank piece of paper, a calculator, your P60, current contract and details of your benefits package and start to do your sums. You need to compare the new offer and your current package like for like. Separate each element of your package out and work through them line by line. How do the car allowances compare? Does the new offer include personal mileage? What about health cover – does it include cover for all the family or just you individually? How are bonuses calculated, when are they paid and how much has typically been paid out in recent years? What impact will a move have on your pension, share scheme, equity? Only by doing this exercise, will you really have an accurate picture of what this move will mean for you financially.

 

  • If you currently work for a large organisation and the headhunt has come from a smaller company, weigh up the relative opportunities presented by staying in your current company (strong brand on your CV, more opportunities laterally, more security) versus making the move to a growing business (more rapid progression, bigger role).

 

  • “Discretion is the better part of valour”. ON NO ACCOUNT, feel tempted to tell your current boss/colleagues that you have been headhunted. While this may give your ego a gentle stroke in the short term, it could plant the seed of doubt in the mind of your employer. Equally, breaking the confidence of the search firm may seem inconsequential, however be aware that reputational integrity, once lost, is almost impossible to recover. These firms have the ears of the most senior HR and Line Directors in your industry and it is prudent to maintain a positive relationship, even if you decide not to pursue the approach.

 

Clearly, this advice is equally relevant whether you have been headhunted or have applied for a role however the big difference with a headhunt call is your state of mind. If you apply for a role, you will have spent time preparing your CV and generally getting in to the mind-set required to find a new role. You will be ready to leave your current company and chances are you will have drawn up a list of your target employers.

A headhunt call, by its very nature, will catch you unawares and you need to understand the steps you need to take if you decide to proceed so you can ultimately make the right decision for your career.

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By Jez Styles, AdMore Recruitment– Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

I thought about writing this blog at 3.30am last night. I had been up for over an hour with my two year old twins whom have been very unsettled by a recent house move. Probably somewhat naively I assumed that our relocation from Kingston to Wokingham would have little impact on the kids. You always hear how children are quick to adapt and given their age I thought they would barely notice any difference. Mum and Dad were still around so what was the problem?

What I hadn’t appreciated was that my little girl has developed a genuine affection for her friends in the various playgroups she attends and that she has reached a point where she craves interaction with the people she knows. Our little boy, being a boy, is a bit oblivious to people but does like his routine. He knows what he likes (Peppa Pig, hiding & big slides) and in Kingston he knew when he was arriving at a favourite playgroup. Overnight they have lost their structure, routine, friends and probably some security through familiarity. Reflecting on this at 3.30am I felt a little stupid, how could I not have foreseen this when day-in day-out I witness a mixture of good and bad new-job-on-boarding processes for the candidates I talk to.

Recruitment consultants are generally paid by companies once a candidate starts in their role. What you may not appreciate is that there is generally a ‘rebate period.’ In essence if a candidate leaves within a certain timeframe the recruiter will have to pay part of the fee back to the company. Rebate periods can be as little as 4 weeks and as high as 12 months. It is a bit of a bone of contention in the industry as recruiters often feel powerless to control how an employer on-boards their employees; and this on-boarding is often what makes or breaks a successful transition. Indeed, I read a stat recently that suggested that 22% of employees leave their job in the first 45 days of employment. However, I don’t want to get in to a debate about that as there are plenty of good reasons why rebate periods exist, I would prefer to concentrate on what we as recruiters can do to ensure a successful job transition. If you are a candidate due to start a new role it is worth bearing in mind that we recruiters (that are focussed on long term relationships…) can/and should offer post placement support:

  • Get the basics right.

Arguably on-boarding starts with the overall candidate experience through the hiring process but the first tangible difference a consultant can make is to ensure a candidate receives a full offer and contract PRIOR to starting. Do not be afraid to push your consultant if you are concerned about any detail in the contract. For example, if you have a query about the pension scheme it is best to get this ironed out prior to starting and through your consultant. You will not have time once you have started to get in to the detail and many employers will assume that as you have started that you will have no queries.

  • Put solid foundations in place:

Ask your consultant to set up a coffee chat with your line manager prior to starting; this is particularly important if the notice period ranges from 3-12 months. It is crucial that you work on your relationship with your new line manager prior to starting.

  • Map the business:

Meet your consultant for a coffee prior to starting your new role and ask them to map the function or indeed the wider business for you. Not only should your consultant be able to talk through the organisational structure but they may also be able to provide insight in to specific individuals, personality quirks, likes/dislikes, interests and as always the politics. This should ensure that you are able to develop a targeted networking plan.

  • Build your network:

Ask your consultant to introduce you to any other relevant contacts they may have in the organisation. That may be through a simple LinkedIn introduction or through an exchange of contact numbers. The chances are the consultant will have placed other people within the business so the contacts should be warm!

  • Seek external support:

At a more senior level your consultant should be able to connect you to a mentor. This would ideally be someone who has operated in similar roles that has a genuine passion for coaching.

  • Talk, Talk, Talk:

Do talk to your consultant over the first few weeks. We do want you to do well, not just be because it means we get paid but because most of us actually like people! If you have any problems your consultant may be able to offer solutions that are not immediately obvious. Do not be afraid to ask for advice about cultural or personal nuances that you have encountered.

So if I was to apply my own advice to my children’s recent change, what I should have done was take the kids to a few playgroups in advance of the move and ideally put the foundations in place for a few friendships. It sounds so simple on reflection…ah well on to the next parental mistake!

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Further blogs on how candidates can leverage their recruitment consultants:

What should your Recruitment Consultant really do for you?

10 Questions every candidate should ask their recruitment consultant

A Candidate’s Guide to Working with Recruitment Consultants

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By Sophie Mackenzie, AdMore Recruitment– Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

This recruitment issue is as old as time itself however it still occurs regularly and causes no end of consternation for everyone involved.

For the in-house recruiter, it places them in the middle of two battling agencies – never a good place to be!

For the agencies, it can be a frustrating problem which can ultimately end in loss of revenue.

The biggest victim in this is the candidate (although they are often the culprit – I will explain shortly…) as this can put them in a very uncomfortable position, damage their candidate ‘brand’ and even potentially jeopardise them getting a new role.

We have been asked by clients several times recently for advice on what they can do when this situation occurs so we thought it was worth sharing our thoughts. As ever, no hard and fast solution but perhaps if more people understood the consequences, we could reduce the frequency with which this still occurs.

Why it happens

There are several reasons why this happens:

An agency sends the CV of a candidate to a client without their permission or knowledge.

Sadly there are plenty of agencies who are still doing this. I understand why – in a competitive market when clients are using multiple agencies for the same vacancy, the process becomes more about speed than quality. Combine this with the micro-managed agency environment where consultants are measured on the number of CVs they send out, it is simply not conducive to any focus on quality or service. This is compounded when the client is happy to use the agency purely as a ‘CV shop’. There is simply no need to add any extra value. There are major issues with this approach. Firstly, it creates risk for the candidate. They may not want their CV to go to a particular client for confidential reasons. It also damages their brand as they are no longer in control of themselves a s a ‘commodity’. For the client, this means that they are looking at CVs of candidates who may or may not be interested in their brand, may not be culturally right and may not even be interested in the job!

A candidate forgets – or lies – about having sent their CV

Looking for a new job is a complicated, time-consuming and bewildering business.  Candidates are overwhelmed by non branded ads on job boards so, when they submit their CV, they have no idea which role they have applied to. Some agencies use this submission as permission to forward their CV straight to the client without speaking to them first so they may never know who has seen their CV. I’m sure we have all had the experience of having spent an hour on the phone, covering a candidate on a role, selling in the company, covering any objections and getting their permission to submit their details, only to find a week later that they went on to the company website and submitted their details direct! Grrr! Often this is done without realising the consequences although occasionally, a candidate will think they are increasing their chances by letting their details be submitted by rival agencies. These things happen and all of us involved in the process need to help candidates navigate these pitfalls by being as explicit as possible about what our actions will be so they can keep track.

One agency submits the CV on the ATS portal, one agency sends it direct to the hiring manager

In theory and when used correctly, an ATS should alleviate this issue, especially if the client adopts a first past the post policy or uses the duplicate alert function correctly. The problem of course is when agencies (that are most likely not on the PSL) bypass this process and send CVs directly to line managers.

So, what to do?

  • If you have an ATS portal, honour it. If agencies submit CVs direct to line managers but the candidate has already been legitimately uploaded to the portal, favour the agency that is a. on the PSL and b. is following your process correctly.
  • Use the duplicate alert on the ATS and penalise agencies that bypass this without your permission eg. by using their own email address rather than the candidate’s.
  • Be wary of CVs that are submitted very quickly after giving out a job brief. Has the agency actually spoken to the candidate? Have they given their permission to submit their application? Asking further qualitative questions about a candidate will help you gauge what value the agency is adding (why are they looking to leave their current role? What interests them about your business? How will they fit culturally?)
  • Ask for a cover sheet to accompany each CV. This is something we used when I worked in-house and it became very clear which agencies really knew their candidates. I know they are the bane of most recruitment consultant’s lives, but too bad! The information on a standard cover sheet is information that a good consultant should be getting in the initial registration call so it really shouldn’t be an issue to complete it.
  • When the CV is submitted by two of your favoured agencies, ask everyone to be transparent. If the candidate experience is important to you, ask the candidate who they want to represent them. Chances are they will favour the agency that had added the most value and who has spent the most time speaking to them about the company/role. By feeding back to both sides, any agency who isn’t adding value will understand that this is really important to you and your recruitment brand and will hopefully do better next time. The agency who ‘wins’ this particular battle will feel justified in spending time doing their jobs properly.
  • Beware of any agency who deals with this situation aggressively – chances are they are treating the candidate in a similar way which is simply unacceptable. In these situations, a good agency will put their own interests aside and ensure that the candidate is protected. Sadly, they often lose out because of this.

All of us working in recruitment have to accept that you will win some and lose some. Those of us who are trying to maintain high standards of integrity will take this on the chin. I like to think that the laws of karma will prevail…here’s hoping!

By Sophie Mackenzie, AdMore Recruitment– Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

Previous Blog Links:

https://admorerecruitment.wordpress.com/2013/02/26/winning-hearts-and-minds-how-to-build-your-influence-in-an-in-house-role/

https://admorerecruitment.wordpress.com/2012/11/08/a-match-made-in-heaven-how-to-get-a-psl-that-works-for-you/

https://admorerecruitment.wordpress.com/2012/10/23/how-to-win-the-heart-of-an-in-house-recruiter/

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Disclaimer: this post contains self-congratulation (apologies…we’re still very excited!)

A week ago, AdMore attended the Recruiter Awards for Excellence 2013 where we were winners of our category – Best Newcomer.

This was our first time attending the awards and it has made me reflect on what this means for us as a company and how valuable the whole experience has been.

Entering the awards took time and effort. We submitted our entry in January, although it took a couple of months of preparation and polishing before we were ready to hit ‘send’. The questions for each category are challenging and really make you think about how you operate, what value you are really adding to your customers and crucially, what makes you different to your competition.

For a business who aims to do the simple things exceptionally well, we also had to give examples of creativity and innovation and importantly, be able to back this up with evidence. There is, quite rightly, an emphasis placed on quality of service and so it was important that we had testimonials from both candidates and clients. Irrespective of the end result, going through this process as a group was invaluable – encouraging us to analyse what we do well and what we must improve upon.

As an industry, we are often judged (both fairly and unfairly!) and so entering the Recruiter Awards gave us an opportunity to be assessed by our peers and by credible industry leaders. The list of judges is impressive and ranges from in-house recruitment leaders and senior directors of international agencies to industry commentators and futureologists.  These people really know recruitment and most importantly, are passionate about the industry.

When we were notified that we had made the shortlist, we were delighted!  For a small business, just getting that far seemed a big achievement and made the hard work of putting together our submission worthwhile. Very quickly, our thoughts turned to the awards ceremony itself. Our table was booked and dinner jackets dusted off…could we, just maybe, win the category?

The event itself was excellent – a great venue, good food and the atmosphere you would expect from a group of recruitment people enjoying a cocktail or two! After a welcome from DeeDee Doke, the Recruiter magazine’s genial Editor and the event’s sponsor Eploy, the evening was handed over to the comedian Ed Byrne who did a great job of lightening the increasing sense of anticipation in the room.  Announcing the nominees and winners of each category was Alan ‘voice of the balls’ Dedicoat and when he read our name out as winners of our category, it was amazing! The OSCARS it may not have been, however the sense of joy, shared experience and frankly sheer amazement that we all felt, will I’m sure remain with us for a long time.

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As a team building exercise, it doesn’t come much better and, although it clearly helped that we won, I would recommend the experience to anyone who takes pride in what they do. We have a shiny trophy for the office and lots of great PR and marketing opportunities – invaluable for a small business. On a more serious note, it has given us a much needed boost in what continues to be a tough market and it has been a little recognition for the founders of AdMore who took the risk of setting up in the midst of a recession. Most importantly, it provides a benchmark and a standard that we have to live up to.

We don’t and won’t get everything right but we are determined to try. What struck me most about all the winners and the nominees last week was that they really cared and that can only be a good thing for our industry.

Irrespective of the outcome, we got so much out of the experience and I would highly recommend it…you never know, you could just win!

So, in the great tradition of awards ceremonies, a few “thank yous”:

To our candidates and clients who we will endeavour to support in the best way we can

To the Recruiter magazine and sponsors of the event for a fantastic night

To the lovely team at Oakleaf Partnership, our table-mates on the night, for their warmth and encouragement

To our families for their support

And last but not least, to the whole team at AdMore – the hard work continues!

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By Shane Horn, AdMore Recruitment – Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

It is a thankless task, and one that is constantly ridiculed and looked at with derision from ‘the other side of the fence.’ The role of an in-house recruiter is tough, caught between the cross fire managing process, expectations and the worst of all: a hungry bunch of agency recruiters! However, not all is lost, that same bunch of recruiters can be your biggest ally if you manage them well. Some handy hints to get the best out of your PSL can be found here and if you follow the tips below you are on your way to less of a headache!

  • Build your team around you

The agencies you have carefully selected to be on your PSL should be working with you. If they are not, get rid. Agency recruiters are used to hearing bad news, don’t think by not answering their call they will go away. Explain what is not working, and why. Call a meeting, or give them a warning, but don’t let the situation drag on. Those that want to work with you will understand the tough job you have and will be honest with you. Get a team of recruiters that ‘get’ your situation. If you can’t speak to them on a Monday because you are in meetings all day, tell them not to call. If you prefer e-mail, tell them not to call!

  • Knowledge is power

It sounds obvious but recruitment consultants spend a lot of time talking to people – candidates you are looking to hire and clients who have similar needs to you. They will know first hand the challenges in the market. Ask their opinion – recruitment agencies are sitting on a wealth of information about salary expectations, market moves, and competitor challenges. Some of the information will be confidential of course however  you can gain a huge amount of market knowledge which you can then share with hiring managers and your wider resourcing team.

  • No nasty surprises

Be clear with your team of agency recruiters. Yes, terms and conditions have been signed, and it is all in there but be clear if there are points that might cause confusion in the future. If you have a 3 month ownership policy in place, tell the agency. If your payment terms are 120 days, tell the agency. No doubt the terms you have in place will be something you have very little control over so explain that this is what we are working with. The agency has a choice to work with you or not and being upfront will save numerous calls and emails further down the line.

  • Admin is a time killer

If you have limited admin support, why can’t the agency help? If you are booking in a number of interviews, get the agency to book them in your Outlook calendar. Be clear about the available time slots and ask the agency to attach the CV if necessary to make the whole process as easy as possible for you.

  • Banish the unwanted

A constant problem for in-house recruiters is the barrage of cold calls and unwanted speculative emails. They have a huge impact on your ability to do an already time-heavy role. If you use a mobile, put your trusted agency numbers in your contacts list. I always made sure I didn’t answer a call from any number I didn’t know. This would save me hours through a week. Also, if you are getting emails from the same source over and over again set up a rule in Outlook to ensure those unwanted emails go straight to your deleted items.

  • Everyone is on the same side

Share as much as you can with your agency team. If you have engaged an agency then I am sure you want them to fill the role?! Tell them the competencies that will be assessed and the hiring manager’s interview style. If you were prepping your direct candidate you would share as much information as possible, so why not with the agency?

  • Not all jobs to all recruiters

Just because an agency is on your PSL it doesn’t give them a divine right to work on every role you have to hire. There will be roles that you will hire direct so again, be honest with the agency. This will help limit speculative applications and ensure that when you do give a role to an agency, they have an expectation they can fill it! If you are briefing 3 agencies, again tell them who they are competing against. Recruiters are a competitive bunch!

Of course some of these points will be easy to install, where others will be impossible depending on your set up. If I could recommend one thing it would be to be honest, treat recruiters how they want to be treated: fair, with respect and as a partner.  If they don’t want to be part of your team, put them on the subs bench – there are plenty of players keen to be in your starting 11.

recruitment

By Sophie Mackenzie, AdMore Recruitment– Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

Next month, one of my colleagues celebrates his 10 year anniversary in Recruitment. He can hardly believe it has been that long. Like the rest of us at AdMore, Recruitment was his ‘second’ career following graduation and a successful period in the Retail and Hospitality industries.

Without doubt, few people choose to begin their career in our industry – often it is something that is suggested by a recruitment consultant who spots the potential, the spark, of someone who could be a success in this challenging role. Arguably, having previous career and overall life experience is of huge benefit in recruitment, not only because it enables you to empathise with the challenges and choices faced by people in their working lives but because it gives you some credibility with candidates and clients – so important in an industry which has very low barriers to entry. It will be interesting to see what impact the new Recruitment Apprenticeship which has been launched recently will have on encouraging young people to choose recruitment as career however there remains the issue of how we try to change the perception of the industry and position it as a career of choice rather than something that is ‘fallen’ into.

To kick off our little crusade, here’s my Top Eleven Best Things About a Career in Recruitment – other blogs to follow (along with the Top Ten Worst Things About a Career in Recruitment!?).

1. Wheeeeeeee!

People often refer to the rollercoaster of recruitment and it really is the best analogy to describe the ups (and downs) we experience on a daily basis. The highs are great – making an offer to a candidate (providing they accept), giving the good news to your client or hiring manager, knowing that you have found a solution for your candidate/client and are a step closer to hitting your target.

2. The people you work with

Ok, I can just imagine the collective eyebrow being raised and of course, we all know people who fit the stereotype of recruitment consultants. However, in my experience, the majority of people I have worked alongside in recruitment have been great fun, bright, hard working and incredibly positive. It is rare to find people who don’t moan about their lot (although many in recruitment have good reason to) but in recruitment, the over-riding characteristics are resilience and the determination to succeed. These are infectious qualities and preferable to other cultures where people complain constantly about their job but do nothing to change it.

3. Variety is the spice of life

Working in recruitment is interesting because, to be any good at it, you need to know your industry sector inside out. You need to understand the job roles that you are hiring, the company culture and the idiosyncrasies of the recruitment process. You have the privilege of hearing about candidates’ career history, family situation and aspirations along with any issues they have faced along their way. Every person you deal with is unique and this provides constant interest (and challenges which I will cover in my follow up blog Top Ten Worst Things about a Career in Recruitment!?).

4. Reward and Recognition

Recruitment can be financially lucrative for the top performers and if you are working for a company who pay acceptable basic salaries in addition to bonus or commission, you can make a healthy living. Senior in-house recruitment positions command significant salaries along with the benefits associated with working for large corporate businesses. Over and above the purely financial recognition, recruitment agencies are generally places where success is celebrated and when you are doing well, your achievements will be well publicised.

5. The challenge

Although the mechanics of recruitment are fundamentally simple (get briefed on vacancy, find candidate that fits, make introduction to client), in reality there is so much more to it than that. People are unpredictable and the real challenge is understanding this, anticipating any changes or pitfalls, planning or reacting accordingly and using your influencing skills to get a positive result. Recruitment tests your inter-personal skills every day and if you love people (warts and all!), this is a great career for you.

6. Stretch yourself

The longer you work in recruitment, the more experience you have of dealing with people at all levels and at all life stages. The challenges outlined above make you question yourself daily and having to use insight and empathy with your candidates and clients means that you develop your own skills accordingly. These inter-personal skills often spill over into your wider personal relationships. There is always something new to learn whether that is about what motivates people or about the new technological developments that are impacting how we source candidates.

7. Problem solving

When a client briefs you on a role, it is because they have a problem which needs a solution. Perhaps there are issues with performance in a role and a new skillset is required. Perhaps the ‘gap’ is holding the growth plans of the business back. Finding a solution to this problem requires more than finding a ‘bum for a seat’. You need to ask the right questions to understand the brief. You need to know what impact the hiring manager and the company culture will have on the search process. You then have to find someone who will have the right mix of skills, experience and behavioural qualities to truly ‘match’ the brief. The search process can be like an intricate jigsaw puzzle…for those who are intellectually curious; it is an interesting and rewarding process.

8. Accountability

The funnel analogy is widely used in recruitment and, although less so when recruiting senior level positions, it is a case of the more you put in, the more you get out. This isn’t just about volume; it is about the quality of each conversation, the quality of the contacts you make and the relationships you build. It is a very transparent industry – you can measure your own activity and often trace results back to their source. There are always lots of different factors which can affect your performance but there is rarely anyone else to blame. This makes you truly accountable for your results.

9. Entrepreneurial spirit

To be a success in recruitment you need to be commercial in everything you do – this is something that you can learn along the way but the ability to spot opportunities and an entrepreneurial spirit certainly gives you a head start. Recruitment consultants are often described as running their own virtual franchise, meaning that you are responsible for developing and growing your own sector and increasing your personal ‘brand presence’.

10. Relationships

When you get it right and are able to build genuine relationships with your candidates and clients, the role is really rewarding. This requires honesty and trust on both sides. There is nothing better than knowing you have helped someone develop their career and even if you haven’t been successful in placing someone, if you can give them some good advice and act as a sounding board, they will remember you. The litmus test is someone picking the phone up to you , sometimes years later, when they are either ready to make a move or are ready to brief you on a vacancy.

11. Talking to people

One of my colleagues (who shall remain nameless) was always in detention for talking in class and this was one of his suggestions about why he loves his job. Clearly, this is not about the ‘gift of the gab’ as this can have the opposite effect but there is no doubt that you need to enjoy talking to people. If you do, you will build rapport easily, ask the right questions, get the right answers and be able to sell yourself and your opportunities effectively. People are fascinating creatures and we are lucky to be able to spend our working lives talking to them!

If you would like any advice about a Career in Recruitment, please contact us.

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By Sophie Mackenzie, AdMore Recruitment– Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

Previous Blog Links:

In House recruiters: How to nurture the relatinoship with your recruitment agency

Be beautiful or useful

Winning hearts and minds: how to build your influence in an in-house role

Hokey Cokey

Photograph: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

By Shane Horn, AdMore Recruitment – Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

I’m an odd recruiter. Not in the sense that I don’t fit the traditional image we all know (and love?!) but because I went in-house, came back out again, and am far better because of it.

My recruitment agency career was going well – I had managed teams, moved to a search firm but still had an itch to scratch. The Holy Grail was an in-house role – how great would that be? No more business development days (fancy dress was not my bag!), no more internal arguments about candidate ownership, no more end of the quarter panic to hit your numbers. No, it would be great. Lots of jobs to fill, with warm line managers who wanted to work with me – heaven!

I really enjoyed my time in-house. It opened my eyes to the issues faced by my clients, which, without the experience I would have no idea of. I had many recruitment consultants ask me; “what’s it like? It must be great working in-house.” Or; “how did you make the move, I am keen to but always get rejected.” Oh, if only they knew! The role of an in-house recruiter is complex, where you are often accountable to multiple stakeholders. It is frustrating and rewarding in equal measure. It is impossible to understand the challenges that are faced everyday unless you have seen them yourself.

What I learnt very early on is that you can’t walk away from a problem. You can’t look at a tough job to fill and say ‘you know what, I don’t fancy working on that’. You can’t put it at the bottom of the pile and hope it goes away. Your clients (the majority just down the corridor) want results, and in some cases can’t understand why a shortlist isn’t forthcoming within 24 hours of the brief! You need to be on top of your game constantly. Who knows who will walk round the corner next and need to know why they haven’t seen any CV’s. You have to give answers and responding with “the market’s tough out there” just doesn’t cut it. Control was also an issue, as it is in any recruitment campaign, but in-house, the variables were huge. If it wasn’t a line manager going off PSL or a recruitment consultant not following process, it was a role cancelled at the last minute or issues getting salaries signed off. Fire fighting is something that is often talked about, but at times, it was a raging inferno and all I had was a garden hose!

Saying all this, I certainly felt valued in my role and felt a part of the HR team. Though my particular role was lonely at times (I would find myself calling recruiters on my PSL for a chat!), I did feel I was making a difference and that I was supporting the business move forward. With an outsider’s point of view, I felt I brought a commerciality to the role and certainly improved the process. So, why did I leave? Something was missing and ultimately it was this that led me back to the shark infested waters of agency recruitment.

What I missed most was the variety offered by working with both client and candidate. I admit, I may have been unlucky with my move in-house as I am sure there are many of you who have the variety I craved. But, as agency recruiters we build relationships on both sides and I really missed this. I missed updating with people to understand how they were doing, helping to shape their careers and offering advice. I missed talking about the wider market with clients, understanding their challenges and looking to help where I can. I also missed the commercial aspect. Reading an article in the press, keen to share that with my network and add some value.

My role now is more varied than ever before, and this is down to the fact I worked in-house. I’m involved in assessment centre design, CV re-writing and job profiling, something I wasn’t in the position to do before making the move. Previously I was in the rut of filing jobs, and didn’t really view recruitment as anything more than that. I feel I now work better with clients, and understand their frustrations and demands. I am certainly treated better – like I still have the old school tie!

By performing both roles I can understand what role is better suited to me, what plays to my strengths. More importantly I was able to join a firm that mirrored my values and beliefs.  I am sure the tag ‘failed recruiter’ sticks with many  in-house people after moving on from an agency because they end up treating recruiters how they were treated.  NOT ALL AGENCIES ARE THE SAME!  It’s not all about sales targets, and constant no finish line mentality. I am sure if more in-house recruiters thought about moving back over the fence the market would be all the better for it. You can still work with clients as if you were part of their HR team, and you can add real value to a business and make a difference – you just need to find the right agency for you. Have a look around, you never know, you might be tempted back to the dark side!

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