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By Sophie Mackenzie, AdMore Recruitment– Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

This recruitment issue is as old as time itself however it still occurs regularly and causes no end of consternation for everyone involved.

For the in-house recruiter, it places them in the middle of two battling agencies – never a good place to be!

For the agencies, it can be a frustrating problem which can ultimately end in loss of revenue.

The biggest victim in this is the candidate (although they are often the culprit – I will explain shortly…) as this can put them in a very uncomfortable position, damage their candidate ‘brand’ and even potentially jeopardise them getting a new role.

We have been asked by clients several times recently for advice on what they can do when this situation occurs so we thought it was worth sharing our thoughts. As ever, no hard and fast solution but perhaps if more people understood the consequences, we could reduce the frequency with which this still occurs.

Why it happens

There are several reasons why this happens:

An agency sends the CV of a candidate to a client without their permission or knowledge.

Sadly there are plenty of agencies who are still doing this. I understand why – in a competitive market when clients are using multiple agencies for the same vacancy, the process becomes more about speed than quality. Combine this with the micro-managed agency environment where consultants are measured on the number of CVs they send out, it is simply not conducive to any focus on quality or service. This is compounded when the client is happy to use the agency purely as a ‘CV shop’. There is simply no need to add any extra value. There are major issues with this approach. Firstly, it creates risk for the candidate. They may not want their CV to go to a particular client for confidential reasons. It also damages their brand as they are no longer in control of themselves a s a ‘commodity’. For the client, this means that they are looking at CVs of candidates who may or may not be interested in their brand, may not be culturally right and may not even be interested in the job!

A candidate forgets – or lies – about having sent their CV

Looking for a new job is a complicated, time-consuming and bewildering business.  Candidates are overwhelmed by non branded ads on job boards so, when they submit their CV, they have no idea which role they have applied to. Some agencies use this submission as permission to forward their CV straight to the client without speaking to them first so they may never know who has seen their CV. I’m sure we have all had the experience of having spent an hour on the phone, covering a candidate on a role, selling in the company, covering any objections and getting their permission to submit their details, only to find a week later that they went on to the company website and submitted their details direct! Grrr! Often this is done without realising the consequences although occasionally, a candidate will think they are increasing their chances by letting their details be submitted by rival agencies. These things happen and all of us involved in the process need to help candidates navigate these pitfalls by being as explicit as possible about what our actions will be so they can keep track.

One agency submits the CV on the ATS portal, one agency sends it direct to the hiring manager

In theory and when used correctly, an ATS should alleviate this issue, especially if the client adopts a first past the post policy or uses the duplicate alert function correctly. The problem of course is when agencies (that are most likely not on the PSL) bypass this process and send CVs directly to line managers.

So, what to do?

  • If you have an ATS portal, honour it. If agencies submit CVs direct to line managers but the candidate has already been legitimately uploaded to the portal, favour the agency that is a. on the PSL and b. is following your process correctly.
  • Use the duplicate alert on the ATS and penalise agencies that bypass this without your permission eg. by using their own email address rather than the candidate’s.
  • Be wary of CVs that are submitted very quickly after giving out a job brief. Has the agency actually spoken to the candidate? Have they given their permission to submit their application? Asking further qualitative questions about a candidate will help you gauge what value the agency is adding (why are they looking to leave their current role? What interests them about your business? How will they fit culturally?)
  • Ask for a cover sheet to accompany each CV. This is something we used when I worked in-house and it became very clear which agencies really knew their candidates. I know they are the bane of most recruitment consultant’s lives, but too bad! The information on a standard cover sheet is information that a good consultant should be getting in the initial registration call so it really shouldn’t be an issue to complete it.
  • When the CV is submitted by two of your favoured agencies, ask everyone to be transparent. If the candidate experience is important to you, ask the candidate who they want to represent them. Chances are they will favour the agency that had added the most value and who has spent the most time speaking to them about the company/role. By feeding back to both sides, any agency who isn’t adding value will understand that this is really important to you and your recruitment brand and will hopefully do better next time. The agency who ‘wins’ this particular battle will feel justified in spending time doing their jobs properly.
  • Beware of any agency who deals with this situation aggressively – chances are they are treating the candidate in a similar way which is simply unacceptable. In these situations, a good agency will put their own interests aside and ensure that the candidate is protected. Sadly, they often lose out because of this.

All of us working in recruitment have to accept that you will win some and lose some. Those of us who are trying to maintain high standards of integrity will take this on the chin. I like to think that the laws of karma will prevail…here’s hoping!

By Sophie Mackenzie, AdMore Recruitment– Specialists in Retail and Hospitality Recruitment, Search & Selection, Talent Management and Career Development.

Previous Blog Links:

https://admorerecruitment.wordpress.com/2013/02/26/winning-hearts-and-minds-how-to-build-your-influence-in-an-in-house-role/

https://admorerecruitment.wordpress.com/2012/11/08/a-match-made-in-heaven-how-to-get-a-psl-that-works-for-you/

https://admorerecruitment.wordpress.com/2012/10/23/how-to-win-the-heart-of-an-in-house-recruiter/

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